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Sábado, 17 de Junho de 2006

How cultural differences affect business?

  • When coloring in 800,000 pixels on a map of India, Microsoft colored eight of them a different shade of green to represent the disputed Kashmiri territory. The difference in greens meant Kashmir was shown as non-Indian, and the product was promptly banned in India. Microsoft was left to recall all 200,000 copies of the offending Windows 95 operating system software to try and heal the diplomatic wounds. "It cost millions," [Microsoft's Tom] Edwards said.  (Byte level research, www.bytelevel.com)
  • When Gerber started selling baby food in Africa, they used the same packaging as in the U.S., with the beautiful Caucasian baby on the label. Later they learned that in Africa, companies routinely put pictures on the label of what's inside, since most people can't read.  (iib.gsu.edu/cgbl/WorkshopII.ppt)
  • A well-designed American car did not sell well in Japan because the chassis was just an inch too long for the standard parking space available at most Japanese commercial garages. (Quality Function Deployment website, www.qfdi.org)
  • A TV commercial boasted about the temperature-sensitive washing power of a brand new laundry detergent, also developed by a well respected American company. The only problem was that at the time, in many traditional Japanese homes, laundry machines were hooked to cold water only; thus, the feature did not make sense to consumers in that particular market. (Quality Function Deployment website, www.qfdi.org)
  • A leading U.S. golf ball manufacturer targeted Japan as an important new market by virtue of the expanding popularity of golf in that nation.  Ironically, special packaging in sets of four was developed for export, although golf balls are generally packaged in sets of three, six or 12 for domestic consumption. The company's sales were well below anticipated volume.  Research eventually targeted packaging in fours as a primary factor for lagging sales.  Four is the number of death in Japan. (Business America, Dec 3, 1979;2, 000025; ABI/INFORM Global pg. 2 "Adapting export packaging to cultural differences")
  • Coca-Cola tried marketing its domestically successful two liter bottle in Spain. It finally withdrew the bottle from the Spanish market when it discovered that the refrigerator compartments were too small to hold the liter size. (eBook "How to Localize Products for Success in Foreign Markets" by Silk Road Communications.)
  • A major soapmaker test marketed a soap name in 50 countries, and what it found was enough to make them change the name. The proposed name meant "dainty" in most European languages, "song" in Gaelic, "aloof" in Flemish, "horse" in one African language, "dim-witted" in Persian, "crazy" in Korean, and was obscene in Slavic languages" (Silk Road Communications eBook)
  • A cologne for men pictured a pastoral scene with a man and his dog. Where it was marketed in Islamic North Africa a dog is considered unclean and a sign of bad luck. (Silk Road Communications eBook)
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publicado por Rute às 15:27

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